Classical Music Reviews

Every week, our professional critics attend concerts throughout the Bay Area to let you know what went well...and occasionally what didn't. Let their insights enrich your musical experiences, and feel free to share your own views!


Archive Review
April 17, 2007

Last week’s San Francisco Symphony concert was an instance of Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas’ brilliantly daring programming. It offered three austere works by Stravinsky plus one super beauty by Toru Takemitsu. Alongside the orchestra there was the Symphony Chorus and the world’s leading clarinetist, Richard Stoltzman, who played what amounts to Takemitsu’s clarinet concerto. I don’t believe the music could have been better performed, but Friday’s concert also suffered from a serious case of gab pollution.

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Archive Review
April 17, 2007

You could tell, from the moment she took the stage, that soprano Laura Aikin is accustomed to much larger venues than the 333-seat Florence Gould Theater in San Francisco's Legion of Honor. A quick glance at her bio confirms that she has performed at most of the world's major opera houses, from La Scala to the Opéra Bastille to the Metropolitan Opera. On Saturday afternoon she offered a modestly proportioned recital program, featuring song cycles by Richard Strauss and Ned Rorem, yet presented with all the bravura of an operatic coloratura.

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Archive Review
April 17, 2007

The New Century Chamber Orchestra's ongoing season of guest-conducted performances has produced some fascinating programs (see, for example, SFCV's reviews of its January and March sets). April's run, guest-conducted by St.

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Archive Review
April 17, 2007

Early-music enthusiasts have been known to say that it's not the size of the voice that counts, but rather the interesting things that it can do. The adage was bolstered by Magnificat's presentation of motets by Chiara Cozzolani on Saturday evening at St. Mark's Church in Berkeley. Encouraged by Music Director Warren Stewart, each of the singers brought individuality, drama, and commitment to the challenging program, and the eight women invested the difficult repertoire with color and nuance.

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Archive Review
April 17, 2007

What do you call someone who speaks three languages? Trilingual.What do you call someone who speaks two languages?
Bilingual.
What do you call someone who speaks one language?
American. (Here the old joke stops.)
What do you call someone who speaks many, many languages? The Kronos Quartet.

Kronos Quartet

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Archive Review
April 17, 2007

... and then there was the concert against carbon dioxide.
Inspired by Al Gore's (and now Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger's) environmental campaign, and the film An Inconvenient Truth, opera conductor Sara Jobin and environmentalist Monisha Mustapha have organized the "Cozy Concert for Climate Concerns," an impromptu musical celebration of the national campaign for "cutting carbon dioxide 80 percent by 2050." The series began on Saturday evening, in San Francisco's First Unitarian Universalist Church.

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Archive Review
April 10, 2007

Conductor Michael Tilson Thomas opened two weeks of his minifestival of Stravinsky-Plus-One last week in Davies Symphony Hall. The San Francisco Symphony programs of both last week and this week are essentially a survey of Stravinsky's wide interests, but with each program offering an important piece by one other composer. What makes such adventures so unusual is how well local audiences eat up such programming in big gulps, especially when the results are as exhilarating as they were at the Thursday matinee.

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Archive Review
April 10, 2007

With the announcement that 2008 will mark the farewell of the Beaux Arts Trio, its every remaining performance is precious. Cofounded in 1955 by pianist Menahem Pressler, who remains with the group (in his 84th year), the Beaux Arts Trio has, for many of us, served as a model of great piano trio interpretation.

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Archive Review
April 3, 2007

Measha Brueggergosman is a trip. A statuesque soprano with a larger than life personality, her eye-catching hair, nose ring, huge smile, and propensity to perform barefoot toy with us as if to say, "Here I am, boys and girls. Accept me on my own terms or be on your way."

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Archive Review
April 3, 2007

An ad hoc chamber group can sometimes be more interesting to listen to than a full-time professional quartet. With the latter, you get glossy perfection, with every detail planned in the course of endless hours of rehearsal. But when local artists get together and prepare a program for a single performance, you can feel the drama and spontaneity that was part of the 19th-century musical environment.

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